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Architects and Planners for Justice in Palestine
UK architects, planners and other construction industry professionals campaigning for a just peace in Israel/Palestine.


Even the dead face eviction at Al-Arakib

23 May 2014         Negev Coexistence Forum for Civil Equality

Sheikh Sayach Al-Turi holds the eviction order he received

Sheikh Sayach Al-Turi holds the eviction order he received

On 21 May 2014, 8 eviction orders were pasted onstructures in the cemetery at Al-Arakib and one was handed out to Sheikh Sayach Al-Turi, the Sheikh of the village. The eviction is to be effected between 12 June and 12 July – a “flexible eviction”. Some of the orders have been issued against persons who are no longer living and are buried in the cemetery, as well as against people no longer resident in the village. Despite some 63 demolitions of the village since 2010, the cemetery, with several homes and other structures within its confines, including a small improvised mosque and minaret for calling people to prayer, has so far been left untouched by the authorities. However, last March various authorities entered the perimeter and photograph the buildings for the first time.  This latest order is a new and very disturbing development with far reaching implications beyond the confines of Al-Arakib itself. It could cause a conflagration throughout the Negev.

Al-Arakib, a village of some 350people went over a massive demolishion in July 2010, including its crops and water supply. The residents however, in spite of brutal police behavior, arrests and injuries did not give up and have maintained a constant presence, rebuilding their structures each time the village was demolished anew.  The Police  sew the families and has claimed over 1.8 million shekels from the residents as ‘payment’ for expenses they had  because of the demolition operations.

Since that demolition in 2010 Sheikh Sayach Al-Turi, who has led the resistance to the demolitions has been frequently harassed and was  arrested several times for trespass. Sheikh Sayach was charged by the state on this issues in more than 20 court cases, and was handed several times with restraining orders preventing him from returning to the village, as have other members of his family. The firm stand of the people of Al-Arakib is not merely a symbol. It may well be that their resistance has deterred the authorities from pursuing equally draconian measures against the many other Bedouin villages under threat of demolition.

Sheikh Sayach Al-Turi says in response:

“To all the Jews who believe in equality and that it is possible for Arabs and Jews to live together, mobilise in support of truth and justice and stand up for every Bedouin home that this racist government intends to demolish. The State tells the Bedouin: You don’t have a place in the Negev, no place in Israel.  This is a great loss for the Bedouin and a great loss for the Jews. As long as there is no recognition of Bedouin rights to their lands, there will be no peace in the region, no equality and no justice.” 

There are a number of legal issues arising from the latest Order, not the least of which is the fact that the case of Al-Arakib and its land claims is still under consideration by the courts and have not been finally resolved.  NCF together with other partners will explore the legal avenues that can be pursued in an attempt to avert this disastrous edict.


Israelis demolish Negev mosque as ethnic cleansing continues

23 May 2014 11:56       Middle East Monitor

File photo of a Palestinian mosque razed by Israel










Palestinian mosque razed by Israel in Gaza.

Israeli bulldozers guarded by a large force of police started to demolish the mosque in Wadi Al-Niam in the Negev on Thursday amid residents' fears that authorities could also demolish homes in the village. A demolition order had been nailed to the mosque wall a few days earlier.

The Negev Foundation for Land and Man denounced the demolition, describing the Israeli act as a blatant assault on the sanctity of the mosque and on Arab rights to live in the Negev. It also noted that the demolition violates the right to freedom of worship as well as international laws and conventions.

The foundation also condemned the police attacks on the residents of Wadi Al-Niam, the demolition of their homes, the confiscation of their property and the destruction of their crops. It stressed that the indigenous people of the Negev Desert are determined to stay in their homes in the face of Israeli scheming and force. It appealed to Arabs in Israel and the Arabs of the Negev in particular to stand by the people of Wadi Al-Niam.

The Islamic movement in the Negev said that the demolition of the Wadi Al-Niam mosque is a criminal act by the Israelis. It is, the movement said in a statement, part of the wider ethnic cleansing of the area by which Israel wants to displace 60,000 Palestinian Arabs from their traditional home in the desert so that Jewish settlers and the Israeli army can move in.

"The people in the Negev have the right to live on their own land," said the Islamic movement. "They have the right to build on it and live on it and worship on it." The demolitions, the statement added, will only increase the people's resolve to stay put on their land.

The movement called on all human rights organisations and institutions in the Negev to stand side by side with the people of Wadi Al Niam, defend their legitimate rights and confront Israel's ethnic cleansing.


Please note: The image used for this piece is a file photo of a Palestinian mosque razed by Israel. It is not the image of the mosque in Wadi Al-Niam.

The image used is by Wissam Nassar, of the destroyed Al-Taqwa mosque in Gaza City, taken on July 26, 2009. The mosque itself was destroyed during Israel's offensive on the Gaza Strip the year before.